Trent 1000 vs. genx-1b

The Trent 1000 family makes extensive use of technology derived from the Trent 8104 demonstrator. In order to fulfill Boeing's requirement for a "more-electric" engine, the Trent 1000 is a bleedless design, with power take-off from the intermediate-pressure (IP) spool instead of the high-pressure (HP) spool found in other members of the Trent family. A  m (110 in) diameter swept-back fan, with a smaller diameter hub to help maximize airflow, was specified. The bypass ratio has been increased over previous variants by suitable adjustments to the core flow.

On December 16, 2003, Boeing announced that the 787 would be assembled in its factory in Everett, Washington . [6] Instead of conventionally building the aircraft from the ground up, final assembly employed 800 to 1,200 people to join completed subassemblies and to integrate systems. [30] Boeing assigned global subcontractors to do more assembly work, delivering completed subassemblies to Boeing for final assembly. This approach was intended to result in a leaner, simpler assembly line and lower inventory, [31] with pre-installed systems reducing final assembly time by three-quarters to three days. [32] [33] Subcontractors had early difficulties procuring needed parts and finishing subassemblies on schedule, leaving remaining assembly work for Boeing to complete as "traveled work". [34] [35] In 2010, Boeing considered in-house construction of the 787-9 tail; the tail of the 787-8 is made by Alenia. [36] The 787 was unprofitable for some subcontractors; Alenia's parent company, Finmeccanicam had a total loss of €750 million on the project by 2013. [37]

Trent 1000 vs. genx-1b

trent 1000 vs. genx-1b

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